November 27, 2021

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Horror and Despair - VG

Horror and Despair – VG

Darkness in the Cinema: Jeremy T. Thomas and Keri Russell in “Antlers.”

Demons in the attic in Furvale, USA.

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Thriller / Horror

“Centuries”

United States of America. 15 years. Directed by Scott Cooper

Med: Keri Russell, Jesse Plemons, Jeremy T. Thomas, Graham Greene, Sawyer Jones, Scott Haze

VG dice show 3 points

The small town of Cisbos Falls in Oregon was uninhabitable long before the monsters – the demons it represented. American Indians Anger – come in the field.

Incest and neglect. Unemployment and condemned homes. opioid epidemic And methamphetamineProduction in abandoned mining lanes. A classroom with technical equipment from the sixties. Decay as far as the eye can see.

Julia Meadows (contactThey do their best to teach in such a class. She recently returned to the city after 20 years in California. Daddy is dead, so it’s safe now. She lives with her brother Paul (Plemons) He is a police officer.

The American Nightmare: Keri Russell in “Antlers.”

Earlier, on another side of the city, Frank Weaver (the fog) was attacked by a “thing” inside the mountain. This happened while his son Aidan (Jones) was waiting for him outside, in a parked car (American ass!). Now the father and son are locked in the attic of the house, where they live and behave like animals. The second son, Lucas (Thomas), takes care of them. Dad is equipped with a heart that glows like glowing coals and horns on his head.

Lucas is 12 years old, but the dark circles around his eyes make him look like a 65-year-old has burned the candle from both ends. He goes to Julia’s class, and the drawings on his plate testify that he is probably not feeling well at home. When ill-treated corpses begin to appear in Sisbos Falls, it’s a short way to Lucas’ house, where Frank and Aidan sit and wait, gnawing at meat hungry.

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Light in the Dark: Keri Russell in “Antlers.”

“Antlers” is at the crossroads where horror and American indie films meet, and where a lot of good has been produced in recent years. Environmental images are self-consciously “realistic”, and are as dedicated to a movie as they are to pure horror scenes.

It is played by decent actors, instead of high school boys and half-naked “screaming queens”: contact, perpetually sympathetic, and Plemons, with its semi-psychotic appeal, buttercup.

When the movie fails to establish itself at the top of the genre, it is in part because the “interpretation” of the central puzzle is so lukewarm. Because the movie is more sad than scary.