December 8, 2021

ModularPhonesForum

Complete News World

Is it the return of the hated nuclear power?

Is it the return of the hated nuclear power?

It will never happen again! It was said after Fukushima and Chernobyl.

These pictures frightened the whole world.

But the protests have now subsided.

In the Scottish countryside, they have no doubt about what to choose: nuclear power over wind power.

TORNESS / DUNBAR, Scotland (Aftenposten): Never again! Activists and politicians agreed on this. The disasters at Chernobyl and Fukushima shattered the future of nuclear power. So far.

– I have nothing against the nuclear power plant. On the other hand, Sinda Cheetham, referring to the ocean, says these ugly windmills.

– I don’t like them.

Couples John and Cinda Cheetham take one of their daily excursions around the massive nuclear power plant in Torrens, Scotland. They live nearby, in the idyllic town of Dunbar.

The nuclear power plant is situated like a besieged castle in the beautiful Scottish countryside. But outside of barbed wire and security cameras, there are hiking trails, jogging trails, swimming areas, and a popular fisherman’s pier. And a wonderful view of the arm of the strait Firth of Forth.

Torness nuclear power plant towers over the landscape. But locals believe that wind turbines change the landscape more than a nuclear power plant.

It is a short drive from Edinburgh down to the North Sea. And a two-hour drive from Glasgow, where a major climate conference is also discussing the future of nuclear power.

A return to nuclear power?

Nuclear power has long been rejected due to the risk of accidents, costs, and handling of radioactive waste.

See also  Norwegian crypto founder with 773 million bitcoin fortune - E24

Today, about 10 percent of the world’s electricity comes from nuclear power. I’ve done that in recent years. In Europe, nuclear power accounts for 26 percent of the energy supply.

Now there is talk of a return to nuclear power.

It’s no coincidence: Europe and Asia are in the midst of an energy crisis.

Read the full case with subscription