August 14, 2022

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Aviation chaos in Europe: - It was far from good

Aviation chaos in Europe: – It was far from good

So far it has been a busy summer for airlines and many airports in Europe, after two years of strict travel restrictions.

The pandemic had severe consequences for the travel industry, after which many airports suffered from staff shortages. This led to chaos in several places.

Among the airports that have felt tremendous pressure this summer are the hubs of Heathrow and Gatwick, two of the busiest in Europe.

Burning to

At Heathrow, they have introduced a customer cap of up to 10,000 passengers per day, as a result of reduced capacity.

On the other hand, London Southend Airport is in dire need of business, according to Sky NewsNow offering to host canceled flights by major airports.

The airport manager, Glenn Jones, is said to have called various airlines and offered to help.

He told Sky News that next summer should be even better.

– He says the past few months have been far from good.

Avisa writes that the airport departs only once or twice a day and that the number of passengers is 95 percent lower compared to what it was before Corona.

Struggling after the epidemic

Only one airline is now using the airport on the outskirts of Essex, as airlines have pulled out during the lockdown to add their routes to larger airports. Only EasyJet remains, which flies only four routes.

The reason for the staff shortage in many places is that the industry is struggling to get back up and hire employees who have been laid off or lost their jobs during the pandemic.

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Many airlines also have employees on strike. Among other things, about 700 British Airways staff at Heathrow have gone on strike since June, mostly women check-in workers.

The reason for the strike was a 10 percent pay cut, which was worked out during the pandemic.

Now, however, the strike has been called off, after employees agreed to offer an eight percent pay increase, according to him. BBC.