January 27, 2023

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Sublime Art in Block A |  arkitektnytt.no

Sublime Art in Block A | arkitektnytt.no

In the future government district, passers-by will be able to look through the glass facade into the large pyramid-shaped access room in the new A building and catch a glimpse of a sublime woman. On Tuesday, it was announced that it was precisely “AAhkA”, referred to as a monumental work, that would adorn Plot A. According to Finnish Sámi artist, Outi Pieski, the fifty-meter-high wall relief features an image of “Mother Earth” and a tribute to “our ancestors” .

While working with art projects, Scandinavian architect John Arne Perkness had what is referred to as an “unusually central role” for an architect. This meant, among other things, that he was part of the judging panel and worked closely with Koro (Art in Public) to evaluate art and understand how art and building can play together.

– This was a positive and enjoyable process and experience. Much of the art in the new quarter is wholly or partly integrated into the buildings and there is a very close collaboration between construction and art. Kuru, with his strong technical team, understood this and therefore worked closely with the architects throughout the process, Bjerkenes, senior partner and design director at Nordic, tells Arkitektnytt.

Playing on Alta women

Outi Pieski’s works were judged in the jury on purely artistic and practical considerations. However, there is clear political symbolism in the fact that a sublime work of this magnitude would be given such a place within the Norwegian government buildings.

The artist himself tells Aftenposten that the work, among other things, “allusions to the thirteen women who served as prime minister during the Alta Affair in 1981, the young warriors who protect nature, and the future generations who live by knowing the past.”

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“The winning draft sets out the theme of gender and power, and also touches on the relationship between the Norwegian state and Sami history,” says Sigurd Sverdrup Sandmu, director of Kuru, in the same place.