November 27, 2022

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- Today's vision wasn't good enough - VG

– Today’s vision wasn’t good enough – VG

Claudie: It wasn’t possible to see a lunar eclipse earlier today.

A lunar eclipse is expected on Tuesday morning in Svalbard. However, good weather was late, and the eclipse was not visible.

Posted:

Between 10.09 and 13.49 on Tuesday you were supposed to do it We can see a lunar eclipse With the naked eye when staying in Svalbard.

– That’s definitely exciting! I’ve seen it once before, but it rarely happens, so it happened!

Meteorologist Marius Obsanger Jonassen, who works at the University Center in Svalbard, was looking forward to spotting the sky phenomenon this afternoon. After making the trip to see the event, the disappointment was real.

The vision today was not good enough. It was generally fine in the opposite direction, but in the direction of the moon there were clouds and mountains. It was so boring, Jonassen says.

Frustrated: Metrologist Marius Obsanger Jonassen was hoping to see a lunar eclipse on Tuesday afternoon.

The moon in the shadow of the earth

On the mainland, the Earth’s shadow does not cover the entire moon this time, but since Svalbard is far enough north that the full moon does not set along the horizon, the phenomenon becomes apparent in fine weather.

But there was good weather in several other places in the world on Tuesday. In the images below you can clearly see the lunar eclipse in El Salvador, China, Myanmar, the United States, France and South Korea:

A lunar eclipse is when the moon crosses the plane in which the earth moves around the sun, at the same time as the moon is full.

This is what University of Oslo astronomer Håkon Dahle told VG.

Then the sun, earth and moon line up in space. Dahli says that the Earth casts a shadow on the moon, and this creates a lunar eclipse.

A total lunar eclipse is also called a blood moon. This is how it looked in 2019.

Correction: VG first wrote that Marius Opsanger Jonassen works for the Svalbard Research Council, but this was a mistake. The right thing is that Marius Obsanger-Jonassen works at the University Center in Svalbard. This was corrected on November 8, 2022 at 4.20pm.