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What urban spaces feel unsafe?  Security and violence against women and minorities are linked to spatial planning

What urban spaces feel unsafe? Security and violence against women and minorities are linked to spatial planning

March 8

Linking security and violence against women and minorities to spatial planning. Ninthu Paramalingam says a lot of sexual harassment happens in urban settings. On Saturday, she called for a debate on feminism, urban space, security and architecture.

On Saturday, March 5, Feminism for the Streets will take place on Saturday Room for architecture and art At Maridalsveien 3 in the district of Grünerløkka. On the occasion of Women’s Day on March 8, professionals, artists, poets and activists will speak about “Why Violence against Women and Minorities is a Spatial Problem”.

What are safe and unsafe rooms, for different groups, it is important to discuss, says the initiator and sociologist Ninthu Paramalingam To the trade magazine Arkitektnytt.

Preventing violence in urban development?

Paramalingam invited five participants to the exhibition to discuss how to create safe urban spaces and public spaces for all.

Among the questions asked by the debate organizer: What do zoning, right-wing extremism and gender-based violence have in common? And can we prevent violence through urban development?

The conversation about security toward architecture and urban development often takes place from the perspective of the white middle class, but we believe this conversation should accommodate more voices, Paramalingam tells Arkitektnytt.

Her claim is that security and gender-based violence against women and minorities are linked to spatial planning.

– You think a lot of sexual harassment happens in urban settings.

She is a social geographer and immersed herself in indigenous perspectives at the University of Tromsø. She is also the project manager for Rom Ung publishing software.

He used to think about feminism and urban space

She told the trade magazine that feminist initiatives for safe urban spaces are more common in Latin America. Such an initiative also exists in Spain.

I’m used to a more inclusive way of thinking about feminism and architecture than other countries. When I started getting involved in Oslo, I didn’t find the same kind of interests. Commitment is there, but it is perhaps more divisive, says the social geographer.

What is the goal now then? Arkitektnytt asks.

“Hopefully there will be more events as we delve deeper into the concrete details of the architecture and planning,” says Paramalingam.

The panellists are:

  • Hawa Moss, adviser to the Red Cross and director general of the foundation on August 10, which will build a memorial and educational center in Perm after the terrorism in 2019.
  • Julie Hatoft, psychologist and project director of the Norwegian National Helpline for Victims of Violence and Abuse in Norway, which is run in cooperation with the Crisis Center in Oslo.
  • Hanna Asfaw, artist and activist at Reduce Husleia.
  • Emma Arnold is a social geographer working in art, urban and cultural geography.
  • Elise Tunstrom, Consultant at Manifest Tankesmie.

See also  Fornbow House of Culture | We need space - we need room