Insisting on the use of offensive words is archaic and silly

Insisting on the use of offensive words is archaic and silly

Someone hanging a “Negerlandspein” sign on a model means there’s very little they can do.

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It is a leader. The editorial expresses the journalistic idea of ​​Bergen’s Dente: a party-politically independent, independent, liberal and capitalist (non-socialist) newspaper.

Someone has taken it Difficulty creating a proper sign with the inscription “Negerlandsbyen”. Then they went up to the model in Kwamskogen and hung it on a tree.

The sign is a provocation, and perhaps meant as such.

“Negerlandsbyen” is a humorous name from the 1950s, when ski tourists from Bergen sat on the modeled sun wall to get a tan.

But apart from that Time the world moved on. Norway has become a multicultural country.

You’d have to have been living under a rock for a long time without the word “Negro” being perceived as offensive to many naturally dark-skinned people.

The reason is that the word is used in a derogatory way, especially about people from Africa.

Solhola model in Kvamskogen.

Then give up Offensive words are simply about folk custom. By using them, you are showing that you have no respect for the person or whom you are talking to. Maybe you’re a racist.

And you can’t pretend it’s not like that anymore.

As Hanne Hellingsson, who discovered the sign on Saturday, tells BT: The catchphrase was something that even children on school trips in the 1990s didn’t know how to say.

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But someone can Don’t let it go. They feel it is their right to say exactly what they want. And of course they can.

But behaving, respecting others, and keeping your mouth shut. It is also possible.

Making and hanging a sign like the one at Kwamskogen is an extreme expression of the obsession that some people have, that they would be free if they didn’t let everything that lives in them explode.

Many have Fueled by such thoughts, it has found a kind of ideological support to come out of the closet in recent years. What used to be the normal folk practice has become to give up the so-called awakened ideology.

Bringing up half or full racist phrases has become a strong protest against political correctness for many.

But this imported American awakening discourse creates a veil that obscures what it’s really about: caring for others.

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Joshi Akinjide

Joshi Akinjide

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