December 5, 2021

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Corona virus and corona |  Big differences: Among some immigrants, vaccine coverage is very low

Corona virus and corona | Big differences: Among some immigrants, vaccine coverage is very low

For many groups, less than 40 percent of them are protected. For those born in Norway, the situation is completely different.

The government cheered, and the Norwegians breathed a sigh of relief: Norway received an additional million doses from Poland, and about 350 thousand doses from a number of Eastern European countries. A little earlier, Denmark received an additional 1 million doses of vaccine from Romania.

Suddenly, for the first time in the shadow of an epidemic, Norway had enough vaccines.

We received the doses because there were high skepticism about vaccines in these countries which meant they were not allowed to use the vaccines. Only 52 percent of the population in Poland is now fully vaccinated, while the proportion in Romania is poor at 30 percent.

By comparison, 68 percent of the total population in Norway is fully vaccinated, and 67 percent in Sweden.

A big difference in who gets the vaccine in Norway

The epidemic hit migrants hardest in Norway, both in terms of the number of infected and among those who ended up in hospital.

FHI has now published new figures on the vaccination rate between groups in Norway based on country of birth, and shows that immigrants from countries that have introduced more vaccinations specifically are at the bottom of vaccine coverage.

Among people aged 18 and over, the rate of vaccination with the second dose is highest among those born in Norway (90%), people born in Vietnam (88%), Thailand (87%), Denmark (85%), and the United Kingdom (85%) and lowest Among people born in Lithuania (41%), Poland (39%), Romania (38%) and Latvia (38%), according to the WHO report.

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Bocholam: – Measures are being taken to increase vaccination coverage

According to Director of Vaccination Non Bocholam at FHI, there are likely several reasons for the significant effects:

It could be because of the Norwegian authorities Not getting enough good information. There may be public skepticism about vaccination and public skepticism about measures and recommendations taken by the government, and it may be because in some cases they received the vaccine in their home country without having it registered in Norway, wrote Bukholm in e-mail to Nettavisen.

Regular efforts are being made to map this out, and measures are being taken to increase vaccination coverage in these population groups. This includes targeted information measures and includes engaging people from the immigrant population who can serve as spokespeople who can contribute to greater support for the vaccination program, says the vaccine director.