Herculaneum: – Survived the disaster – Destroyed by the tourist

Herculaneum: – Survived the disaster – Destroyed by the tourist

The first warning of the impending disaster came in the early morning hours of August 24, 79 AD. Some residents of the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum woke up to their homes suddenly beginning to shake.

This was not the first time the ground shook. Most of the residents didn't care and slept.

It all looked like it was going to be another hot August day. But at lunchtime, there was a loud crash that made the entire ground shake. The largest buildings in the cities began to shake dangerously.

The next moment, a huge column of ash and pumice was pumped out of Vesuvius. Daylight disappeared, and ash, pumice, and large boulders began to fall on the terrified residents.

He was Beginning of the End For both Pompeii and Herculaneum.

Death on the beach

During the eruption, the inhabitants of Herculaneum fled for their lives down to the shore where the ships of the fleet began transporting them to safety. As night fell, hundreds of people were still waiting to be rescued, and more and more were pouring in.

The end of the world: This is how artist John Martin imagined the eruption of Vesuvius when he painted “The Destruction of Pompeii and Herculaneum” in 1822.
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But the ships could no longer approach, as the coastline was blocked by millions of tons of rock thrown up by Vesuvius.

Refugees could only seek shelter on boats. They clung to each other inside the small rooms as they hoped for the salvation that would never come.

Herculaneum was then hit with a fire fountain of ash and pumice at 800 degrees. The heat wave swept through the city streets and descended towards the sea.

Cruel death: During excavations at Herculaneum in the 1980s, researchers found more than 300 skeletons of people huddled together in boats and on the beach.  Image: Shutterstock/NTB

Cruel death: During excavations at Herculaneum in the 1980s, researchers found more than 300 skeletons of people huddled together in boats and on the beach. Image: Shutterstock/NTB
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The refugees on the beach died instantly, as the avalanche of ash caused their skin and flesh to vaporize, their brains to boil and explode, and their bones to shatter like glass.

He found one around 300 dead on the beach and in boats – They froze in a moment of terror, many still wrapping their arms around each other.

The intense heat turned the human brain into glass

The intense heat turned the human brain into glass


Digging for ancient treasures

Since Herculaneum was covered with a larger layer of ash, it is It is better preserved than Pompeii. The layer of ash – which eventually turned into solid rock – protected the antiquities from thieves.

Major excavations that began in 1927 and are still ongoing have revealed incredible treasures. A large part of the ancient city was also liberated: colonnaded streets, bathing and sports facilities, and luxurious homes equipped with statues, paintings and mosaics.

Old and New: Parts of the ruined city are buried under the modern city of Ercolano.  In the background we can clearly see Vesuvius.  Image: Shutterstock/NTB

Old and New: Parts of the ruined city are buried under the modern city of Ercolano. In the background we can clearly see Vesuvius. Image: Shutterstock/NTB
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Both Herculaneum and Pompeii are on the UNESCO World Heritage List, and a number of finds can be seen at the Archaeological Museum of Naples. You can also visit the city itself and experience it with your own eyes.

Now the tourist is accused of vandalism and defacing works of art.

The Independent Reports say the person in question must have destroyed the wall of one of the Roman villas that survived the deadly volcanic eruption 1,945 years ago.

AMAZING DISCOVERY: - Never disappoints

AMAZING DISCOVERY: – Never disappoints


It was vandalized with graffiti

According to the police report, the 27-year-old tourist was quickly identified after workers at the archaeological site discovered graffiti scrawled in black permanent marker on a white portion of a painted wall.

Police reported that the graffiti must be the man's signature.

Vandalism: Police in Naples published this photo showing how graffiti was drawn in black chalk on a painted wall in an ancient Roman house in Herculaneum.  Image: NTP

Vandalism: Police in Naples published this photo showing how graffiti was drawn in black chalk on a painted wall in an ancient Roman house in Herculaneum. Image: NTP
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– Any harm that destroys our heritage and identity. Italian Culture Minister Gennaro Sangiuliano said in a statement that this bad act should be severely punished.

This is not the first time ancient ruins have been vandalized by tourists.

Last year, an English tourist was caught carving his fiancée's name into the wall of the Colosseum in Rome using a key.

This video from the Italian capital is now spreading widely, sparking strong reactions on social media. Video: Twitter. Reporter: Annabel Brun/Dagbladet TV
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The tourists' video eventually ended up with Sangiuliano, who believes the tourists should be punished according to “current legislation.”

– I consider it very dangerous, insulting, and a sign of great impudence for a tourist to insult one of the most famous places in the world in order to engrave his fiancée’s name, angrily on Twitter.

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Jabori Obasanjo

Jabori Obasanjo

"Coffee trailblazer. Certified pop culture lover. Infuriatingly humble gamer."

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