January 28, 2023

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– Tone-deaf – NRK Culture and Leisure

– Now I think you put too much makeup on the bride, says Morten Thomassen, president of the Norwegian Grand Prix Club.

The musical make-up that the fan club leader is talking about is the auto tune.

It is an electronic instrument that corrects sour notes if the singer misses them. Starting this year, artists can autotune the Norwegian finals of the Melody Grand Prix.

– Allow auto-tuning for the deaf.

Morten Thomasen says it can be difficult to distinguish those who cheat a little with autotune.

Photo: Ksenia Novikova/NRK

A little bit of the spirit of Grand Prix is ​​that every now and then there’s a song where the person singing isn’t having a good day at work. You can smile at it or think it’s a little sad – depending on how good the song is, Grand Prix fans say.

At the International Grand Prix Final, auto-coloring will not be permitted.

– We are afraid that whoever wins the Norwegian final will not be a really good singer. Thomassen says that’s our biggest concern.

Not a magic tool

The worry that Norway might end up with a singer who doesn’t deliver the goods at the international final is not shared by Norwegian Grand Prix boss Stig Carlsen.

– Autotune is not a magic tool that turns a bad singer into a good singer.

MGP president Stig Karlsen at rehearsals the day before the final.

Stig Karlsen is the Director of the Melodi Grand Prix in Norway.

Photo: Stein Roar Leite/NRK

Almost all music programming on television, Carlsen says, has been using autoplay for many years.

Audiences expect a professional audio experience on TV. Then we have to follow.

Was it a problem that artists missed?

– We conduct comprehensive auditions and make sure we have the best singers. Autotune is a utility for delivering a more professional audio experience, says the head of Music Competition.

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More benefits

In 2022, Christian Ingebrigtsen stood without an autotune on stage at the Norwegian MGP Final.

We are used to listening to radio songs where this is done. So in many ways we make it fairer. Also, excessive use of auto-tune is a tool used in a lot of music.

He also says that autotune reduces the risk of a performance being spoiled by technical issues with the audio the artist is getting observer.

It has happened to many artists. So I think that’s mostly a positive thing.

Christian Ingebrigtsen

Christian Ingebrigtsen will compete at the MGP in 2022.

Photo: Ksenia Novikova/NRK

On the other hand, I think it’s a little sad for the industry that we’ve come to the point where we have to get this help. Because it removes some of the nuances, those blue tones and imperfections that create personality and authenticity, says the former MGP artist.

He asks NRK to turn around

At this year’s Norwegian finals, artists can choose whether to use autotune. It hasn’t been determined whether or not the public will find out who’s using the autotune, MGP General Karlsen says.

Most people don’t care about technology. The fans are the ones reacting right now, and they’re interested in all the details, big and small. We’re thrilled with all your enthusiasm, but I think a lot of people are probably overthinking that.

in the hard ones He says fan circles don’t see auto-tune as a technology Thomassen in the fan club. The reactions are many.

Morten Thomasen, President of the Norwegian Grand Prix Club

Morten Thomasen.

Photo: Ksenia Novikova/NRK

– Fans asked NRK to change it up, and they became less reactive than they should have been.

Autotune is common to other music software. What’s different about Grand Prix?

A little bit of soul in Melodi Grand Prix has been singing right from the start. Every now and then we hear how the artist performs. Changing them would be like removing the tree on Christmas Eve.

Thommasen admits fans will have to live with the changes.

– We jackpot fans are a bit reserved. We want to go back to the good old days.

– What are the good old days?

– For me, the good old days are the eighties.

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