Trien Nielsen from Tromsø is stopped at minus 34, but no one stops to help – NRK Trams and Finnmark

Trien Nielsen from Tromsø is stopped at minus 34, but no one stops to help – NRK Trams and Finnmark

– It really shocks me, says Drine Nielsen.

On Saturday morning, she and her daughter were about to ride their horse from Nannestat to Srpsburg. They agreed with the national team coach that because of the unusually low temperatures, they would be allowed to train at his isolated riding stables over the weekend.

– It was moderately cold, so I drove the car in the same low temperature on Friday. Then there was no problem with him, says Nielsen, originally from Tromsø.

But after a few kilometers on Saturday, the first warning light started flashing in the car. Nielsen planned to stop at a gas station in Gardermoen to see what the problem was, but she didn't make it that far.

Trine Nielsen and her daughter had to wait about 25 minutes in the cold car.

Photo: Private

– Before that, all the warning lights were on. Nielsen says the car rattled and died.

She didn't even have time to pull over before he stopped

– It was on the E16 and there was a lot of traffic. Then the panic spread a little bit, says Nielsen.

Had to get police help

He put on his hazard lights, asked his daughter to call the stables to have someone pick up the horse, and she herself called the NAF for roadside assistance. There was a line in line, and Nielsen realized it might be a long time before they got help.

– I felt more and more panicked. Then I told my daughter that if she had to call the police and get the horse out, I would have to have help with traffic. It's minus 34 degrees, so it could be dangerous, he says.

A police patrol was to be sent. Meanwhile, they sat in the car and waited together with the horse and two dogs.

– If I had gotten out of the car, I would have lost what little warmth I had, says Nielsen.

In this car, Trine Nielsen, her daughter, a horse and two dogs were waiting for help.

In this car, Trine Nielsen, her daughter, a horse and two dogs were waiting for help.

Photo: Private

It got cold quickly in the car, and the dogs were wrapped in fleece blankets as they waited for police and roadside assistance. At the same time, Nielsen was surprised that no one stopped to help them on the busy road.

– Everyone knows how cool it is and how dangerous it is. This actually shocks me, but I don't know how Austrians are. He says you think people have a mobile phone and it definitely works.

– Provide assistance

Nielsen estimates they waited about 25 minutes before the police arrived. They and the dogs were then allowed to sit in the warm police car while they waited for the car to pull up.

Nielsen and her daughter were allowed to warm up in a police car while they waited for the car to be towed.

Nielsen and her daughter were allowed to warm up in a police car while they waited for the car to be towed.

Photo: Private

This time it went well, but Nielsen has given clear encouragement to fellow road users.

– Stop and ask if everything is going well and if there is anything you can do to help. Getting a car to warm up is helpful. Even if it is someone we don't know, we should forget our human nature and help others. One should not forget to observe, he says.

Do you stop when you see a car with flashing lights on the road?

John Harry Svendsen is a consultant at NAF. He thinks how good it is for people to stop if they see a car with hazard lights on the road.

– If you see someone standing on the side of the road with their hazard lights on, it's a good idea to stop. It is clear that there is someone who needs help. He says if they have arranged for help, you can drive.

Svendsen points out that it's important to park where it's safe for you and other traffic so you don't create traffic-hazardous situations.

John Harry Svendsen, Adviser NAF

Jan Harry Svendsen, a consultant at NAF, believes everyone should stop and offer help if they see a car with hazard lights on.

Photo: Arne Fossland / NRK

In the temperatures seen in large parts of the country over the past week, it doesn't take long for a car with the engine off to get seriously cold.

– I recommend on cold days like now, in fact always in winter, to bring warm clothes, good shoes, a hat, gloves and a scarf. So you are always prepared if something happens. Now it is not a good idea to drive in small shoes and skimpy clothes. If something does happen, it can quickly turn into a very unpleasant and dangerous situation, says Svendsen.

He also advises keeping a woolen blanket in the car to wrap around your livestock.

– Bring a blanket, food and something warm to drink so you're a little more prepared if something happens, Svendsen encourages.

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