May 18, 2022

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- Omigron's stake now stands at 20 per cent - VG

– Omigron’s stake now stands at 20 per cent – VG

Pandemilaben: The unit for PCR coronary diagnosis is called “Pandemilaben” at Oslo University Hospital. Here, one of the bioengineers analyzes the samples on Friday afternoon.

Omigron variant is more common in positive samples at Oslo University Hospital (OUS). At the same time, the lab warns that response time may soon bang.

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Oslo University Hospital received more than 10,000 PCR tests on Friday. Of these, more than 1,100 are probably positive – which corresponds to a new daily record for the laboratory.

All positive samples are re-tested for virus variants.

– Omigran’s stake is now 20 percent, says Liz Lima Andresan.

He is a specialized bioengineer in the “Epidemiology Laboratory” at the University Hospital of Oslo

Most samples from OUS analytics are from Oslo, but the lab obtains samples from Sorlandet. Tests by Kristiansand, Skien, Larvik, Sandefjord and Tønsberg end at OUS. In addition, the laboratory releases Ahaz through samples of croton.

– Most Omigron cases are from Oslo, but it spreads relatively quickly. We find omigran everywhere where samples are submitted. It equals quickly, and we don’t see big differences, he says.

National Institute of Public Health (NIPH) Previously rated By the end of January the Omigran variant may become a dominant variant.

The ratio of omigran to positive samples of OUS analyzes is as follows:

OUS has the task of analyzing 10,000 samples a day. This includes positive samples to be analyzed for viral variants.

– Response time is coming soon. We work as hard as we can, but still fail to stay up to date, says Anderson.

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All PCR tests that come into the lab must first be analyzed to see if they are positive or negative. Then all positive samples should be re-analyzed whether they are delta or omigron.

– Response time is on average too long. That’s what Andreson says now.

– There are many tests now. We are up to 10,000 people a day every moment. We don’t have more hours a day, says Anderson.

He says most of the work is done manually.

– Each car should be unloaded and all brushes should be taken off with tweezers. He says a test takes about 5 hours to analyze a sample.

In recent days, however, it has taken up to 16 hours to inspect samples.

He talks about a lot of extra time for staff and 12-15 hour long shifts. Nevertheless, many have signed up to do extra work to maintain efficiency at Christmas.

At work: It was like this at the Epidemiology Laboratory in OUS on Friday afternoon.

Evaluates each analysis

– What is very different for us is the high ratio of positive samples. Previously it was 2-3 per cent, now it is 16-17 per cent. There is a lot of work to be done on positive tests says Lisa Lima Andreson.

He is a specialized bioengineer in the “Epidemiology Laboratory” at the University Hospital of Oslo.

All PCR tests that come into the lab must first be analyzed to see if they are positive or negative. Then all positive samples should be re-analyzed whether they are delta or omigron.

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– There are about 1000 positives a day, so we have to take another round. We need to go a little further, but not so much, says Anderson.

In the gallery you can see how biological engineers see the difference between a delta and an omega (the first image is the delta variant, the second is the omega variant):

– We sit and watch all the curves. Then we look at 96 samples at a time and evaluate each one, says Anderson.

Up to 1000 positive samples per day, a lot of evidence goes into the analysis.

– Initially when Omigron and Delta had different isolation rules, it was a bit difficult. Andreson says we got a lot of phone calls if it was one or the other variant.

– It was completely hopeless.

He emphasizes that the release of test results is “horrendous”.

– It has no national organization. In Oslo, an amazing system was created, here we send only electronically. But, for example, we need to send or invite emails with priority files to Skien, Porsgrunn, Larvik, Bamble, Tønsberg, says Anderson.

Only bio-engineers report the test results to municipalities.

– This requires a lot of resources. They sit down and call and list different names with test results, she says.

Andresen calls on a national organization to provide analytical results to municipalities.

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