SAS gets abolished the most – you have the right to do so

SAS gets abolished the most – you have the right to do so

SAS canceled far more flights than its Norwegian rival, and in February it was worse than it has been in a long time. This is evidenced by the latest traffic numbers from the companies.

Lies behind Norway: SAS CEO Anko van der Werff hasn’t been able to catch up with Norwegian in terms of regularity. Photo: Chris Anderson/TT

In February, SAS managed to carry out 97.7 percent of its planned flights, while Norwegian carried out 99.4.

Both of these numbers may sound high, but the difference is actually huge, explains aviation analyst Hans-Jürgen Elnas.

With 600 flights scheduled per day, the regularity of 97.7 per cent means that SAS has to cancel 15 flights per day. In contrast, Norwegian has to cancel 2-3 out of 350 daily flights.

For SAS, this means tens of thousands of passengers are affected by canceled flights every month.

The problem is not new. The SAS system has always been significantly less regular than the Norwegian system. Aside from this summer’s strike, the numbers for February are the weakest the company has provided in the past 12 months.

The red graph shows that, with one exception, the Norwegian has achieved regularity of 99 percent or more in the past year.

Hans Jørgen Elnæs asks the audience to write down the numbers and keep them in mind when going out and traveling.

If you want to achieve something important, the difference between good and bad regularity can be decisive.

Aviation expert: Hans Jørgen Elnæs at Winair Photo: Martin Leigland

Aviation expert: Hans Jørgen Elnæs at Winair Photo: Martin Leigland

SAS knows it can get better

– Delays and cancellations are tedious for the customer and costly for us, so we do our best to avoid that. We are constantly working to fine-tune all parts of production, to ensure planes take off as planned, says SAS Press Director Tony Sund.

The Consumer Council also reacts to all cancellations.

– Compared to Norwegian, SAS has a job to do to reach the same level. I don’t know the reason for the relatively low regularity, says senior legal advisor Thomas Iversen at the Consumer Council.

The information is very bad: Thomas Iversen of the Consumer Council believes that SAS does not inform customers well enough when things go wrong.

The information is very bad: Thomas Iversen of the Consumer Council believes that SAS does not inform customers well enough when things go wrong.

SAS points out that directly comparing companies flying different route systems is not entirely correct.

Canceling a flight on a route with many departures makes it kinder to the passenger, who then gets a nearby replacement instead, hence a short delay for passengers, says Tony Sund.

Your rights when canceling a trip

If the accident occurs and the flight you booked is canceled in the last two weeks before departure, you may be entitled to compensation in the EU and EEA. Compensation rates are set by the European Union and depending on the length of the trip, can add up to a lot of money quickly:

  • NOK 2,800 (€250) for trips of 1,500 km or less.
  • NOK 4,380 (€400) for trips over 1,500 km within Europe.
  • NOK 6,720 (€600) for trips of 3,500 km or more.

Compensation may be reduced or waived entirely if the airline is able to rebook you on another flight within a reasonable time.

– We have found that many people do not realize that they are entitled to compensation in addition to a refund or rebooking. So there’s probably a good figure that doesn’t require a standard compensation when a flight is canceled, says Iversen at the Consumer Council.

Refers to the board Trip calculator This is where you can calculate what you are entitled to in compensation.

Huge sums to save for SAS

both of them Sass And Norwegian It contains separate forms for travelers who wish to claim compensation.

If everyone subject to cancellation files a claim, it could amount to huge amounts. A simple estimate shows that the bill in this case could exceed NOK 100 million for SAS, just in February.

After the strike last summer, the company closed 1.1 billion SEK To cover customer compensation claims.

Thus, there is a lot of money to be saved if SAS can improve the regularity.

SAS is now working hard to improve its operational performance. They have appointed Jason Mahoney as their new Chief Operating Officer. Elnæs says he comes from British Airways, and would probably like to have a handle on this.

– How regular should it be for a well-run airline?

–99 percent or better, though there’s wiggle room in winter.

Thomas Iversen of the Consumer Council is hopeful that SAS will improve regularity.

– SAS only earns a little bit with low regularity, quite the opposite, so they’d have a lot of interest to focus on this.

Our goal is 99% regularity. This winter we have been affected by difficult weather conditions, but we believe that this summer we will reach our regular targets, confirms Tony Sund,

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Dalila Awolowo

Dalila Awolowo

"Explorer. Unapologetic entrepreneur. Alcohol fanatic. Certified writer. Wannabe tv evangelist. Twitter fanatic. Student. Web scholar. Travel buff."

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